I'm Kobayashi. This is mostly just reblogs of anime I'm watching. If you want translations, search the /translations tag, or /master-post for the Witch Craft Works Omake.

 

rebeccasugar:

rasamune:

kasukasukasumisty:

Steven Universe - Steven and the Stevens (Sneak Peek)

RIP CRYSTAL GAMS

guys I’m worried about Pearl

you should be

themaefive:

axonsandsynapses:

yuletidekarkat:

dannygayhealani:

creatingaquietmind:

the speech impediment of the 21st century (by Marc Johns)

I’ll fuck you up buddy this is not a speech impediment it’s linguistic evolution!! the existence of the phrase “Aisha was like” allows the speaker to convey whatever Aisha said without making the listener assume they’re quoting Aisha directly while still maintaining the FEELING of what Aisha said.
ie, Aisha said she didn’t want to go out with me VERSUS Aisha was like, “I’d rather kiss a Wookie”.
the addition of “XYZ was like” lets the speaker be more expressive and efficient and it is a totally valid method of communicating information!!

With the way language has evolved, this is one of the few ways I can even think of to express in casual conversation what someone said. 
"So I said to Aisha," is certainly used, but if you remove the "so," which implies casual tone ("and" can be used in the same way), you get
"I said to Aisha," which is really formal in most English dialects/variations. I don’t know about all, but in New England dialects, you sound like you’re reading aloud from a novel.
"I told Aisha," is really only used when you continue to describe, not tell, what you told her. Ex: "I told Aisha that James was too punk for her" works while, "I told Aisha, ‘James is too punk for you’" crosses the line back into formalness of the "I said."
Things like “I asked” or “I answered [with]” are similar levels of casual and efficient to the “So, I said [or say, as many conversations about the past take place in present tense anyway, as if the speaker is giving a play-by-play in the moment]” but are specific to only certain situations. 
"I was like, 'Marc Johns, what is your obsession with restoring archaic speech patterns and interfering with the natural progression of English from complex to efficient?'" envelopes all of these easily and is accessible and crisp, and allows for more variations on inflection than the others.
Of course, James is probably like, “I already fucking said that.” But eh, I tried adding on.

#linguistics #a.k.a. how I learned to stop worrying and love the evolution of the English language without being a discriminatory elitist jerk (via crystalandrock)

This a million times

themaefive:

axonsandsynapses:

yuletidekarkat:

dannygayhealani:

creatingaquietmind:

the speech impediment of the 21st century (by Marc Johns)

I’ll fuck you up buddy this is not a speech impediment it’s linguistic evolution!! the existence of the phrase “Aisha was like” allows the speaker to convey whatever Aisha said without making the listener assume they’re quoting Aisha directly while still maintaining the FEELING of what Aisha said.

ie, Aisha said she didn’t want to go out with me VERSUS Aisha was like, “I’d rather kiss a Wookie”.

the addition of “XYZ was like” lets the speaker be more expressive and efficient and it is a totally valid method of communicating information!!

With the way language has evolved, this is one of the few ways I can even think of to express in casual conversation what someone said. 

"So I said to Aisha," is certainly used, but if you remove the "so," which implies casual tone ("and" can be used in the same way), you get

"I said to Aisha," which is really formal in most English dialects/variations. I don’t know about all, but in New England dialects, you sound like you’re reading aloud from a novel.

"I told Aisha," is really only used when you continue to describe, not tell, what you told her. Ex: "I told Aisha that James was too punk for her" works while, "I told Aisha, ‘James is too punk for you’" crosses the line back into formalness of the "I said."

Things like “I asked” or “I answered [with]” are similar levels of casual and efficient to the “So, I said [or say, as many conversations about the past take place in present tense anyway, as if the speaker is giving a play-by-play in the moment]” but are specific to only certain situations. 

"I was like, 'Marc Johns, what is your obsession with restoring archaic speech patterns and interfering with the natural progression of English from complex to efficient?'" envelopes all of these easily and is accessible and crisp, and allows for more variations on inflection than the others.

Of course, James is probably like, “I already fucking said that.” But eh, I tried adding on.

  (via crystalandrock)

This a million times

peashooter85:

Ancient Persian Freezers —- The Yakhchals

Today in the modern world we take freezers, and the frozen results of freezers for granted.  But in ancient times, cold drinks, frozen desserts, and chilled tropical cocktails were a luxury unknown to most people.  However the idea of artificially freezing goods is nothing new.  As far back as 400 BC, the ancient Persians built special freezers called yakhchals.  Yakhchals were large buildings used for storage of ice and foodstuffs during the hot Persian summers.  Typically they were around 60 feet tall, and had a large subterranean storage space dug out from under it.  The Yakhchal itself was made from a special type of mud clay called sarooj which was composed of clay, sand, lime, goat hair, egg whites, and ash mixed in a special proportion which made it extremely resistant to heat transfer.  In other words the inside stayed cool, while heat from the outside was prevented from entering the building because of the thick insulated walls.  This combined with the subterranean storage ensured that whatever goods were stored in the pit stayed cool, as temperatures below ground level are usually around the 60 to 65 degree Fahrenheit range.  However, these designs were not what made a yakhchal a freezer.  There was one other brilliant design feature which ensured that the yakhchal would stay frosty all year long.

At the top of the dome was a small hole, or series of small holes called windcatchers.  Typically windcatchers were pointed in the direction of the prevailing winds.  Due to its conical shape there was always a negative pressure gradient inside the yakhchal.  According to Bernoulli’s Law air flow at a high pressure will always move toward areas of low pressure.  Thus air from the outside was constantly flowing through the yakhchal.  In addition, according to Venturi’s Principal, whenever air flows through a small hole, the smaller the hole, the greater the speed of the flow.  The small hole, or series of holes of the yakhchal ensured that air passed into it at great flows.  What resulted was a great amount of outside air entering into the yakhchal at high speeds.  While the air itself wasn’t cool, the flows at which it was being entrained into the yakhchal created temperatures that were below freezing. Typically the windcatchers were cut in such a way that the incoming jet of air would be directed onto the storage pit.

The ancient Persians primarily used their yakhchals for storing ice and foodstuffs.  During the summer, Persian nobles often enjoyed a refreshing frozen treat called faloodeh (pictured above), which is made from thin noodles with syrup made from sugar and rose water, then flavored with lemon, lime, fruits, almond, pistachio, and other flavorings.  Due to the Persian’s freezing technology, faloodeh (which is still popular today) goes down in history as one of the first frozen desserts.  The practice of building and using yakhchals continued up to the 20th century, when they were eventually replaced with modern freezers and refrigerators.

(Source: eartharchitecture.org)

tokimekiwaku:

that reminds me i made this but was too lazy to work on everyone else, here u go 

tokimekiwaku:

that reminds me i made this but was too lazy to work on everyone else, here u go 

johnnywoestar:

*sees american flag* wow…thats a nice jojo reference i had no idea the people of this country were such big johnny joestar fans

kurokoshirai:

>i find that eli and nozomi’s friendship is really beautiful
>i find that eli and nozomi’s friendship


>eli and nozomi’s friendship

>friendship

kurokoshirai:

>i find that eli and nozomi’s friendship is really beautiful

>i find that eli and nozomi’s friendship

image

image

>eli and nozomi’s friendship

image

>friendship

image

(Source: lovelive-confessions)